THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHER


Old World Images of Paris

Paris: My 2000 Collection of new images

The 24 Images of Paris are organized into 6 groupings.

Paris 1   Paris 2   Paris 3
Paris 4   Paris 5   Paris 6


The all-new 2000 series brings you the incomparable City of Paris. You will be introduced to the most famous Parisian landmarks, including the spectacular Notre Dame Cathedral, Napoleon's Arc de Triomphe, the soaring Eiffel Tower--as well as the famous Seine River dividing the left and right banks.

Every aspect of Paris is a delight, from its grand boulevards and monuments to its bohemian neighborhoods of narrow cobblestone streets. My favorite image from this collection is a view from the top of Notre Dame, where in the foreground, a large menacing gargoyle views medieval Paris and the Seine River.

Paris 1 

"Shakespeare and Co"
This bookstore is run by George Bates Whitman (self-professed grandson of Walt). Whitman purchased part of Syulvia Beach's library, which is housed at the top of a treacherous flight of stairs. During the early 1920's when Ernest Hemingway was a struggling young writer, he would borrow books and Sylvia Beach would let him pay when he sold a story.

"Van Gogh- 1890"
Vincent Van Gogh spent the last 70 days of his troubled life in Auvers-sur-Oise, furiously painting away, producing some of his most powerful works. Initially Van Gogh found peace in Auvers by throwing himself into his work. But Van Gogh's old funk soon returned, and at age 37, he shot himself and died on July 29, 1890.

"Smallest House (Le Petit)"
The smallest house in Paris is now a restaurant and is next to Shakespeare & Company bookstore on the left bank.

"Paris Flower Market"

Paris 2


"Champs-Elysees Evening"
The most renowned avenue on earth begins its stately procession to the Arc de Triomphe from the west side of Place de la Concorde. At the Rond-Point, the Champs-Elysees completely changes from a shady green belt to a broad, bustling avenue as it gently climbs to the Arc de Triomphe.

"Tufleries Gardens"
A favorite spot for Parisians and visitors alike, these gardens were laid out in the mid-16th century, commissioned by the noted landscape gardener, Andre Le Notre who also created the magnificent gardens at Versailles.

"City of Light"
Paris truly is the "City of Light" as seen in this view from the Pont Alexandre III bridge over the Seine River on a spectacular evening of changing light and colors. In the background is the Eiffel Tower built for the World's fair of 1889 and was, at that time, the tallest structure on earth.

"Book Stall on Seine"


Paris 3

"Idyllic Moment (vine covered cottage)"

"1900 Bistro (Latin Quarter)"
The Latin Quarter on the Left Bank of the Seine in Paris was settled by the Romans right after their conquest of the Ile de la Cite. Most of what is seen in the neighborhood today stems from Paris's medieval days as a center of learning. This lively district is crowded with student, and many of the cafes and shops retain a rumpled bohemian allure.

"Notre Dame at Twilight"
The harmonious strength of the cathedral's outline, the proportions of its facade, the subtle combination of simplicity and refinement in its design, are undoubtedly the perfect expression of French Gothic architecture. The vast interior can accommodate up to 9,000 people.
"Le Petit Zinc"
This is a great place to sit down and just watch the world go by. Near the famous Deux Magots, you will find this charming cafe and many others while exploring the delightful narrow streets and passageways leading off one of the main centers, Place St. Germain-des-Pres.


Paris 4

"Au Vieuf Paris"

"Hilltop Cafe - Montmartre"
You will find this intimate cafe in the heart of Montmartre, the highest point in Paris. Climb the Sacre-Coeur Basilica for a vast panorama.

"Agile Rabbit Cafe"
This little cafe in hilltop Montmartre is the busiest night spot in Paris.

"Tuileries Carousel"
This turn-of-the-century carrousel is at the edge of the Tuileris formal gardens, extending over half a mile along the Seine River as far as the Place de la Concorde.


Paris 5 

"Monet's House and Gardens"
As a protest against the conventional, hidebound 19th century French art establishment, a group of renegade artists led by Claude Monet and his friends exhibited some of their canvases at a friend's gallery in Paris in the spring of 1874. Here in Giverny, at his house and serene gardens built in 1883, Monet created his greatest works.

"Cafe De Flore"
One of the three most famous cafes for the writers of the 1920's.

"Lost in Time (Auvers)"

Just 20 miles outside of Paris, Auvers-sur-Oise is a picture-perfect French village. Here you can walk in the steps of Van gogh and Cezanne, whose portrayals of dreamy local scenes are world famous.

"21-23 Marais"
This old store front is one of the best preserved in the 4th arrondissement (district) of Paris. Today, the Marais has been reborn as an active and fashionable neighborhood.


Paris 6

"Palais Royal Bicycles"

"Sacre-Coeur"

"Metropolitain - Abbesses"
The metro entrance on the place des Abbesses has a glass-roofed, wrought-iron structure, originally designed by Hector Guimard at the turn of the century. From this metro station, a funicular at the end of the street, leads directly to the Sacre-Coeur Basilica atop Paris' highest point.

"Gargoyle View over Medieval Paris"
One can round out a visit to Notre-Dame by climbing the Toweres for a close look at the gargoyles and for a splendid low-level view of medieval Paris.


Check the Art Show Schedule for when I will be near you.

The 24 Images of Paris are organized into 6 groupings.

Paris 1   Paris 2   Paris 3
Paris 4   Paris 5   Paris 6

 



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